Acta Orthopaedica et Traumatologica Turcica
Research Article

Comparison of 25-OH vitamin D levels between children with upper and those with lower extremity fractures: A prospective case-control study

1.

Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Mardin State Hospital, Mardin, Turkey

2.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Mardin State Hospital, Mardin, Turkey

AOTT 2022; 56: 76-80
DOI: 10.5152/j.aott.2022.21018
Read: 485 Downloads: 152 Published: 01 March 2022

Objective: The aims of this study were (1) to compare 25-OH vitamin D levels between children with upper and those with lower extremity fractures and (2) to determine whether 25-OH D insufficiency prevalence is increased compared to healthy controls.

Methods: This is a prospective case–control study for 12 months. The study was conducted with children aged 5-18 years, including 60 children with non-displaced, impaction type upper extremity and lower extremity fractures resulted from low-energy trauma. In addition, 60 healthy children were included as controls. In all participants, risk factors for low bone mineral density were assessed and serum 25(OH)D levels were measured. Vitamin D levels were compared among groups.

Results: Vitamin D deficiency (25-OH D <20) was 14.8 times (OR= 95% CI= 5.61 - 39.8) and 2.9 times (OR= 95% CI= 1.46-5.75) higher in patients with upper and lower extremity fractures, respectively. In the upper extremity fracture group, serum 25-OH D level was considered deficient (25-OH D level=<20 ng/mL) in 91.6% (55/60). In comparison, it was considered as insufficient (serum 25-OH D level=20-30 ng/mL in 8.3% (5/60) of the patients. In the lower extremity fracture group, serum 25(OH)D level was considered as deficient in 75.0% (45/60), while it was considered as insufficient in 25.0% (15/60) of the patients. In the control group, serum 25-OH D level was considered deficient in 10.0% (6/60), while it was considered insufficient in 61.6% (37/60) of subjects. The 25-OH D deficiency and insufficiency were more common in the whole fracture group (upper plus lower extremity fracture groups) when compared to healthy controls.

Conclusion: This study has shown that hypovitaminosis D is associated with an increased risk for fracture in the pediatric population, and the fracture risk is higher in upper extremity fractures than in lower extremity fractures. In children with fractures, routine vitamin D evaluation should be considered.

Level of Evidence: Level III, Diagnostic Study

Cite this article as: Ergün T, Cansever M. Comparison of 25-OH vitamin D levels between children with upper and those with lower extremity fractures: A prospective case–control study. Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2022;56(2):76-80.

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ISSN 1017-995X EISSN 2589-1294